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Introducing the eCharge Network- New Brunswick’s first EV charging network

July 7 2017, 14:32 PM

Introducing the eCharge Network- New Brunswick’s first EV charging network

EV drivers, it’s time to hit the road in New Brunswick. 

We’re excited introduce you to the eCharge Network- the first electric vehicle public charging network in our province. This network will include standard level 2 charging stations across New Brunswick and a fast-charging corridor along the TransCanada Highway, from Edmundston to Aulac.

Encouraging more New Brunswickers to drive EVs is an essential part of our plan to support climate change action. In New Brunswick, an electric vehicle owner can shrink their carbon footprint by approximately 80%, thanks to our renewable and non-emitting energy supply. By the end of July 2017, EV drivers will be able to pull up to one of the 10 DC fast chargers along the Trans-Canada highway and recharge their EV’s battery in about 30 minutes. With less time spent charging up your car, you can spend more time on the road, exploring all the great things New Brunswick has to offer- whether you’re from here, or just visiting.

So, where can you charge up?

By the end of July you can find the DC Fast Chargers along the TransCanada at the following locations:

  • Edmundston Truck Stop, Edmundston
  • Irving Oil Grand Falls Big Stop, Grand Falls (St. André)
  • Johnson Guardian, Perth-Andover
  • Murray’s Irving, Woodstock
  • Petro-Canada, Prince William
  • Irving Oil Lincoln Big Stop, Lincoln (Waasis)
  • Youngs Cove Irving Oil, Youngs Cove
  • Irving Oil Salisbury Big Stop, Salisbury
  • Magnetic Hill Irving, Moncton
  • Irving Oil Aulac Big Stop, Aulac

In addition to the fast-charging corridor along the Trans-Canada highway, NB Power will install fast-charge sites at five locations throughout northern New Brunswick in fall 2017, cost-shared with the New Brunswick government. Locations include the Restigouche, Chaleur and Miramichi regions, as well as the Acadian Peninsula.

Here’s a clip from NB Power President and CEO Gaëtan Thomas announcing the launch of the eCharge network on July 7 at the Atlantic Nationals Car Show in Moncton.

To find these stations as they become installed or level 2 chargers, check out our station map.

We’re working together with businesses, institutions, municipalities, and with support from important partners like Natural Resources Canada, to develop and grow the eCharge Network for the benefit of New Brunswick EV owners and those EV drivers visiting the province. 

Are you a business, municipal administrator or institutional representative who would like to offer EV-charging to your clients or residents? Learn more about becoming a charging network champion!

How much will it cost to use a fast charger? A standard level 2 charging station?

The charging rate is $15/hour, billed by the minute and based on the total time connected to the station. This rate is competitive with the industry standard. In order to use an eCharge Network charging station, EV drivers must become members of the network by signing up at eChargeNetwork.com. The rate fees for a standard charging station are either $1.50/hour (billed by the minute and based on the total time connected to the station) or $3.00/session, with the rate fee being set by the charging station owner.

Haven’t decided if you’re ready to make the switch to driving an EV? Check out this post to learn more about the benefits of making the switch to driving electric.

 

 

First-of-its kind net-zero ready community getting ready for buyers in Riverview

June 26 2017, 08:42 AM

First-of-its kind net-zero ready community getting ready for buyers in Riverview

Dobson Landing is a first-of-its-kind community in Atlantic Canada that combines smart technology and innovative energy efficiency in contemporary homes in Riverview, New Brunswick.

The community will have 260 units made up of single family homes, condominiums, three multi-unit residential buildings and retail spaces. All homes will use at least 50% less energy than typical code-built homes. Each home comes ready to be set up with smart accessories that homeowners can control with smart phones and tablets.

Dobson Landing provides NB Power with a unique research opportunity that doesn’t exist elsewhere in New Brunswick.


NB Power Pilot Project

We’re teaming up with Dobson Landing to give home buyers the chance to participate in a 5-year energy storage pilot project.

The homes in this community will all be solar-ready. With this partnership, homeowners can lease solar panels and equipment from NB Power for less than buying it on their own. NB Power will also install a smart home storage battery, free of charge. The value of the battery is $12,000.

We will use this battery to test the limits of what they can do when paired with solar panels. We hope to gain insight into how these batteries work together with solar panels. From there, we plan to use this information to develop innovative energy storage solutions for New Brunswickers.

This pilot will also allow us to figure out what upgrades we would need in order to set up community generation across New Brunswick to help create a cleaner energy future.

Want to take part in our pilot? Please contact the Dobson Landing developer for more information and a registration form.

The birds are back in town

June 14 2017, 13:33 PM

The birds are back in town

NB Power line technicians and other crews work alongside different types of nature within their day-to-day jobs. Trees, shrubs and even squirrels can interfere with power lines and other electrical structures. One of the main threats to energized equipment are birds, particularly ospreys, or larger birds of prey.

In order to ensure safe, reliable energy to our customers while also keeping osprey populations safe, NB Power follows an Avian Protection Plan (APP). The APP is designed to protect migratory birds by reducing the number of interactions birds make with electrical equipment. This is accomplished by identifying high-traffic osprey areas and modifying our structures with safer parts. The APP also directs maintenance crews on how to avoid and, when necessary, handle active bird nests.

Ospreys are attracted to utility poles because they serve as vantage points for hunting, roosting sites, eating platforms, a place to nest, territorial boundary markers and shelter from the elements. Usually birds can interact with utility poles without any harm coming to them, but there is always a risk of the birds coming in contact with the energized equipment- this can be dangerous for both the birds and our equipment, as it can cause harm to the birds and cause power outages for our customers.

Baby birds are at even greater risk, as they awkwardly move around equipment while learning to fly. Sticks or other nesting material that fall from the nest can also cause short circuits.

We take several measures to prevent harm from coming to birds and potential outages from their activity. This includes developing a special training program for employees who are directly involved with the design, construction, operation and maintenance of electrical facilities and equipment.

We also have plans in place to avoid building transmission lines in the following areas whenever possible:

  • wetlands;
  • known bird concentration areas (sensitive areas, ecological reserves, etc.);
  • daily movement flyways (e.g., between a wetland and adjacent agricultural field);
  • habitat of species at risk; and
  • areas with a high incidence of fog and mist

Osprey contact with transmission lines usually occur on lines that are close to areas where ducks, geese and other large water birds frequently fly. In up to 90%of cases, birds come in contact with an overhead wire instead of the more visible energized conductors. Approaching birds will often fly upwards to avoid the conductors, only to hit the wire. Research has shown that removing the overhead wire can decrease those collisions by half.

NB Power has plans in place to place lines in a way that reduce the risk of ospreys and other large birds making contact with these lines. For example, we build new transmission lines at the same height or lower than nearby trees and vegetation. Birds will gain altitude to fly over the obvious tree line and avoid any contact with the line.

Finally, we work with the Department of Natural Resources to build high wooden platforms to encourage nest-building away from our poles. When we discover active nests on our structures, we assess to determine if they are immediate threats to the electrical system. If the nest doesn’t pose a threat, we will inspect the area after the osprey chicks leave the nest (end of the summer) but before the following nesting season (early spring) takes place. After the baby birds have left the nest, we can transfer it to an adjacent osprey platform.

NB Power restoration update

May 19 2017, 17:24 PM

NB Power restoration update

At approximately 9:30 p.m. on May 18, 2017, a powerful thunder and lightning storm bringing strong winds swept through the Acadian Peninsula. Environment Canada is saying that winds may have hit 190 kilometres per hour. Several poles on the causeway and bridge from Shippagan to Lamèque, and also in the Pokeshaw and Anse Bleu area, were affected by the high winds.

Thursday night, crews safely restored electricity to 2500 customers from a peak of approximately 7,000. Efforts were complicated by ongoing lightning. 

Replacement equipment like poles, power lines and structures were sent from Fredericton to the northern area overnight Thursday. Fifteen new poles were required. None of the infrastructure which was damaged was new since the last ice storm.

Power is restored to Lamèque & bridge is reopened to traffic. Customers remaining without power should all be restored by 3pm Saturday.

Customers are reminded to stay clear of downed lines and equipment, and to be mindful of the safety of crews that may be stopped along the roads working to restore power.

Catalysts seeing cleaner energy in 20/20

May 12 2017, 12:13 PM

Catalysts seeing cleaner energy in 20/20

This week, 20 participants from Indigenous communities across Canada are in Richibucto, NB to learn about ways to develop clean energy projects in their communities as part of the second annual 20/20 Catalysts Program.

The Program is designed to bring First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Catalysts, or leaders, together to learn from Indigenous leaders who have completed their own clean energy projects as well as energy industry experts. Catalysts will acquire skills, tools and knowledge on how to plan, finance and execute clean energy projects within their home communities.

“It’s an Indigenous clean energy capacity building program. What this program is doing is essentially helping communities move their clean energy projects forward, which can be a huge support to them socially and economically,” said Eryn Stewart, Program Manager of the 20/20 Catalysts Program.

Mentors and coaches will guide and support the Catalysts through the program, including experienced staff from NB Power.

“We have mentors from across the country who have already done projects of their own. Supporting these catalysts, these participants, in those initiatives is extremely valuable for the future of Canada going forward,” Stewart said.

The Catalysts toured the Mactaquac Generating Station and the NB Power Products and Services Lab on May 9 to see how clean energy is being utilized in New Brunswick. Week two of the program will take place in Canmore, Alberta and week three will be held in Wakefield, Quebec.

The curriculum of the Program is made up of community engagement, business and project planning and financing. Sessions will cover topics like Smart Communities, Exploring Energy Efficiency and Community Energy Planning Simulations.

There are over 165 clean energy projects with indigenous involvement operating across Canada. Program participants are part of a group that will spread the ideas fostered in New Brunswick across the country to create more clean energy projects in the coming years.

We are excited to have the Catalysts of 2017 join us in New Brunswick and wish them the best with the rest of the program.

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