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Why LED’s flicker- and how to stop it

June 28 2018, 15:42 PM

Why LED’s flicker- and how to stop it

Have you installed LED light bulbs only to have them start flickering on and off? Well, you’re not alone.

LED fixtures/bulbs are operated by an electronic driver in which some are more susceptible to noise, {voltage fluctuations}, than others depending on the quality of the fixture/bulb.

So what’s causing the flicker? It could be a number of things. But most commonly, LED bulbs may flicker or dim in your home when there are voltage fluctuations in your home’s wiring.

When electrical loads turn on and off in your home, this creates a change in voltage levels, which may cause the LED lights to occasionally dim or flicker.

But there are other reasons that may be causing your lights to dim or flicker. Let’s take a look:

  1. Inrush current from appliances

    Certain appliances in your home need more power when they first turn on. The inrush current of motors within appliances causes the voltage to drop and if the lights are on the same circuit you may see dimming of these lights. This is true for many types of lighting including LED.

    You should already have appliances on separate breakers such as your fridge, stove, washer and dryer. If this isn’t the case then a certified electrician should be called to investigate further.
  1. Loose wiring or loose bulb

    Another thing that commonly causes flickering in LED bulbs is loose connections or circuits. This is easy to fix. Just screw the LED bulb in tighter to see of that fixes the problem.  If there’s a lot of dust in the fixture, first blow out the connection points to remove the dust before putting the bulb back in. 

    There may also be loose wiring at the fixture connection point. A certified electrician will disconnect power to the fixture and re-tighten the wiring to make sure it’s tight and secure. If there are numerous light fixtures dimming at the same time then the electrician will investigate at the panel and/or junction box to ensure that all connections are properly secured.
  1. Dimmer compatibility

    Some existing and even new dimmer switches may not be compatible with LED lighting or you may have a non-dimmable light in a dimmable fixture. Carefully reading the labeling on your bulbs and fixtures and making sure you have the right bulb for the job can fix this. Dimmers also have wattage ratings which differ depending on the type of light source whether it is LED, incandescent, etc. This affects the number of light fixtures on a dimmer depending on the individual wattages of each. The practise of ganging dimmers or switches within the same back box will also further de-rate the wattage the dimmer can safely handle. A certified electrician will determine by referring to the Canadian Electrical Code the correct load permitted.

    Be sure to buy high quality with recognized certification (CSA, ULc etc.), ENERGY STAR® certified LED bulbs when upgrading your lighting in your home. 

 

How run-of-the-river stations work during the spring freshet

May 1 2018, 13:41 PM

How run-of-the-river stations work during the spring freshet

NB Power’s hydro facilities are located along the Saint John River system. They are “run of river” facilities with very little storage capability. Storage is measured in hours, unlike larger facilities like Churchill Falls in Labrador which can store water for months. Water coming from upstream into the headponds must be used for generation at that moment, or must be allowed to bypass the dam. Put simply, the water that flows in must flow out.

The Mactaquac Generating Station at full load passes water through at 80,000 cubic feet per second. Any flow greater than that must pass through the spill gates. In 2018, the Saint John River flows at Mactaquac were more than 300,000 cubic feet per second. As a result, water at Mactaquac was passing through the spillways. At high flows, above plant generating capacity, the water coming in must be released immediately to maintain the proper slope on the headpond to allow the river to flow downstream.

Essentially the river returns to its natural state during high flow events. In order to maintain the natural flow of the river and allow the water to pass the facilities safely, NB Power has very specific operating guidelines.

Water naturally runs downhill. Increased water flow requires there is adequate slope on the river or headpond to continue the natural flow of the river. In order to accomplish this, NB Power lowers the Mactaquac headpond level at the dam to maintain this slope, thus allowing the passage of natural river flow. When the river flow decreases, the headpond level will return to normal levels.

In the lower Saint John River Basin the Reversing Falls in Saint John creates a natural barrier in the river system that is essentially the narrow end of the funnel. With the current river flows being greater than 300,000 cubic feet per second, approximately only half of that water can pass through the falls at low tide. As a result, a bathtub effect is created in the lower basin whereby the water that is not able to pass through the falls backs up and cause flooding. This is compounded during sustained high flows like New Brunswick is currently experiencing.

Higher than average snow fall in North Western New Brunswick and Northern Maine coupled with rain events has resulted in these sustained high flows.

NB Power’s highly trained staff works closely with Riverwatch, the province’s Emergency Measures Organization and communities all along the river during these events.

NB Power is constantly observing and communicating river and station conditions with the goal of operating facilities with the least possible impact on the natural flow of the river while doing everything possible to keep its infrastructure and people safe.

 

               

What happened yesterday to cause an all-day outage in Moncton and Riverview?

January 21 2018, 15:26 PM

What happened yesterday to cause an all-day outage in Moncton and Riverview?

 Early morning yesterday a large number of customers in the Moncton and Riverview areas were impacted by a transmission outage. Many customers have asked us why this outage happened and why did it take so long to restore power.

Restoration work requires a sequence of events that must take place in a specific order before the next task can occur. Many things can affect the timing of the sequence, like access to location, needing specialized equipment etc.

In yesterday’s case, an equipment fault happened in a remote location at an intersection of two transmission lines feeding three separate substations. Transmission lines feed the distribution substations that feed the distribution lines which in turn, feed into homes and businesses.

A transmission outage – like we saw on Saturday – is more difficult to address and results in larger outages. Crews were dispatched but given the remote location of the fault, more time was needed to get to the site, find the fault, bring in specialized equipment like off-road machinery, excavator, crane etc.

The initial plan was to make necessary repairs at the source of the issue, so crews outlined a plan to make the repairs, obtained work permits, brought in the heavy machinery and resources. Unfortunately, crews ran into some difficulty executing the original plan and decided to manually reconfigure the transmission circuit, isolating the damaged portion and try and energize the transmission line from another source. Once this work was done on the transmission lines, crews then needed to focus on restoring the impacted substations.

Transmission lines need to be energized before the distribution lines can be re-energized. While crews were working on the transmission lines, other crews were working to get the distribution lines ready to pick up the load once re-energized.

During this time our website displayed incorrect information regarding customers’ estimated restoration times and total number of customers impacted by the outage. We apologise for this. In cold winter months, when the power has been out for a long period of time, we can experience what is called “cold load pickup” meaning the grid is overloaded when it’s restored, and by design in order to protect itself from damage, will go out again. Some of our customers may have experienced one of these “cold load pickup” outages yesterday. Most customers were restored by 9 pm last evening.

As you can see, power restoration is not a simple task but we can assure you our crews were working as fast as possible to rectify the situation and we absolutely understand this was not an easy situation for customers, especially in winter months. We thank you for your patience.

Huge transformer finds new home in Keswick

October 27 2017, 13:16 PM

Huge transformer finds new home in Keswick

It’s not every day you can walk out your front door to see a 260 tonne transformer cruising past your house. But for Keswick Ridge and Burtt’s Corner residents, that was the case this past weekend.

This new transformer made its way through the area for the final leg of its journey to the NB Power terminal in Keswick. It’s one of the largest of its kind in the province!

After being built in the Netherlands, it was shipped to Halifax, arriving in September. From there, it continued its journey by rail to Napadogan. Here, it was loaded onto  an equally big trailer for a 3.5 day trip along mostly backroads to its new home. A full convoy of trucks, escort vehicles and flaggers were on hand to make the journey smooth and safe for everyone involved and watching nearby.

The Keswick terminal is an important part of New Brunswick’s electric grid. There are 2 power systems that run at the highest voltage levels (345 kV and 230kV) – and a 3rd at a lower voltage of 138kV - to take power from our stations and interconnections to areas it’s needed in the province. The Keswick terminal brings these systems together.

Generating stations in Southern New Brunswick- including Mactaquac- and one of our interconnections with the US go through this terminal. Most of the power that serves Fredericton and surrounding areas also comes through Keswick.

So, how does a transformer work?

It takes energy that comes in at one voltage level and changes it to another- either making it higher (up to 345kV) or lower (down to 230kV.)  

This is different from a substation, which takes higher voltages of energy on the transmission system and brings it to a lower level for the distribution system. Once on the distribution system, the smaller, pole-top transformers you see in your neighborhood help bring that voltage down to a safe level for your home.

This new transformer will add extra capacity at the Keswick terminal and help make the power grid more flexible and resilient. This allows us to continue to bring safe, reliable power to you and your family.

 Check out the video below to see the transformer on the move!

 

Holy Ship! Undersea Cable Project ramps up with world-leading technology

November 17 2016, 13:13 PM

Holy Ship! Undersea Cable Project ramps up with world-leading technology

Meet Isaac Newton – a 12,500 tonne cable installation vessel from Europe that’s helping lay specialized undersea cables between New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. These cables will provide NB Power with the ability to sell additional electricity to PEI in the future, which may result in increased export sales.

After taking a trans-Atlantic journey from Rotterdam to Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island in October 2016, the vessel, with its crew of 75, began its task of laying two 16.5 kilometre, 180 MW cables, that weigh approximately 3,500 tonnes in total, underneath the cool waters of the Northumberland Strait. This work will continue for the next few weeks.

So, how does it work?

This hulking mass of yellow and grey steel is equipped with state of the art systems that allow it to simultaneously dig narrow trenches for the cables, as they unravel from either of the two cable feeders into the seabed below with minimal interruption of the bed and surrounding sea life. Once laid, the same equipment used to dig the trench will adjust the newly laid cable in the right position in the trench.

To help navigate this 460 foot ship along the right path, the crew uses a remotely-operated submarine, which glides along in front of the Newton, giving the crew a close up look at the installation work on the ocean floor.

This Isaac Newton is just the newest piece of machinery used in the complex puzzle of running 33 kilometers of cable under the sea. In May, Maritime Electric also brought in “The Starfish,” a marine excavator from Belgium to help break ground near Cape Tormentine in New Brunswick. Other specialized equipment and crews have also joined this project along the way, including mechanical marine dredges from Quebec City.

Interconnection Upgrade Project

These new undersea cables will complement and eventually replace aging cables that are nearing the end of their life and will offer enough new capacity to meet the Island’s growing energy needs now, and in the future. 60 km of new transmission line construction between Cape Tormentine and Memramcook and substation upgrades in Memramcook will also take place to complete the work on this project.

This project is a collaborative partnership between the Government of Canada and the Government of Prince Edward with Maritime Electric as the construction lead. The project is expected to be completed in May 2017.

 

 

 

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